Interview with Paul Hawirko 1.6

Dublin Core

Title

Interview with Paul Hawirko 1.6

Subject

Easter
Christmas
weddings
travel
meals

Date

2004-05-18

Format

audio

Identifier

2004-091-1711

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Interviewer

Lesiv, Mariya

Interviewee

Hawirko, Paul

OHMS Object Text

5.4 Interview with Paul Hawirko 1.6 2004-091-1711 29:19 U2 Local Cultures Easter Christmas weddings travel meals Hawirko, Paul Lesiv, Mariya mp3 2004-091-1711.mp3 0 http://206.12.88.230:8080/lcp/2004/2004-091-1711.mp3 Other audio English 0 Sundays, Easter, visits Sundays were special as no one was allowed to work on Sunday (besides the basic chores with the animals). At Easter, Paul's mother would make paska and babka, and shaved horseradish with boiled eggs. People in those days had no advanced warning of neighbours coming to visit as communication was difficult. Thus, it was always a surprise when people came by. Paul was amazed that his mother could put out a diversified meal with very little notice. Paul remembers having to kill a chicken because company had arrived. Company was always asked to stay for supper. 56.00011, -117.00262 12 Locality: Reno, Alberta 232 Christmas Christmas was celebrated with a special dinner: turkey, ham, cabbage rolls, pyrohy, head cheese, wheat with poppy seed and honey, and pickled herring. They used to be able to purchase salted herring and then they pickled it themselves. When he got older, Paul could look forward to one gift at Christmas. There was a dish Paul remembers that was made from the juice from sauerkraut, dried mushrooms, potatoes, and it was served cold. They enjoyed it in the summer time. Christmas was celebrated in January as they followed the Julian Calendar. When they came into Edmonton in 1944, they tried to celebrate both December and January Christmases (due to school and working schedules). Paul's family never had a Christmas tree. Paul remembers getting a present and a big meal. The first gift Paul received was either a firetruck or an aeroplane (toys). He also received a gun, a Mickey Mouse watch, and Paul can't remember what else. He still has the aeroplane, but he gave the other gifts to some of his nieces. Everyone received gifts and his parents gave each other something. During the 30s, gift giving was minimal. During Christmas, neither hay nor straw was brought into the house. There was no Christmas tree in the community. The kids did not go carolling. Paul knows they used to have extended celebrations with families they were quite close to. They would go from one house to the next. There was a lot of singing during these visits (Christmas carols). 56.00011, -117.00262 12 Locality: Reno, Alberta 931 Easter, weddings Paul can only recall one detail about Easter: the food. He still boils egg and shredded horseradish for Easter. The food was not blessed in the church as there was not church. The weddings in the 30s were nothing compared to Edmonton and the surrounding area. The weddings they had in Reno were a far shorter version of what was had in Edmonton. There was a lot of drinking (lots of it moonshine). Ukrainian weddings in Edmonton area were a multiple day event. Paul doesn't remember the outfits worn by the bride and groom, but he remembers they changed over time. Photographers were not often brought to weddings during the 30s as people couldn't afford them. Paul's sister's wedding was a small affair, not even in a church. There was always someone around that could play some music at a wedding, but never a formal band. Paul can't remember more than 2 weddings from when he was a kid and they were held in private homes. There were people dancing, but there wasn't much room for dance. There was singing at the weddings, but Paul can't remember the songs. Paul can't remember the food at the weddings, but they didn't have as much variety in food as they do now. 56.00011, -117.00262 12 Locality: Reno, Alberta 1662 Travel and transportation Paul's family didn't travel much as he was growing up. Within the community, they travelled everyday to get to school, usually by buggy, wagon, or sleigh. Towards the end of the 30s, there were a few cars, but most people couldn't afford to buy or maintain them. Paul's family had a car, briefly, in Peace River, but Paul's father never had a car after that. 56.00011, -117.00262 12 Locality: Reno, Alberta No transcript. audio 0 https://localcultures.ukrfolk.ca/ohms/render.php?cachefile=

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Citation

“Interview with Paul Hawirko 1.6,” Local Cultures, accessed February 6, 2023, https://localcultures.ukrfolk.ca/items/show/565.