Interview with Albert Nieberding 1.1

Dublin Core

Title

Interview with Albert Nieberding 1.1

Subject

ethnic identity
family life
immigration
labor (work)
languages
chores
Christmas
cook stoves
farm chores
fish
lamps
mail-order catalogs
pigs
potatoes
religious identity
stews
turnips
vegetables

Date

2003-07-22

Format

audio

Identifier

2003-091-419

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Interviewer

Scalena, Matt

Interviewee

Nieberding, Albert

OHMS Object Text

5.4 Interview with Albert Nieberding 1.1 2003-091-419 30:01 G1 Local Cultures Nieberding, Albert Scalena, Matt wav 2003-091-419.wav 0 http://206.12.88.230:8080/lcp/2003/2003-091-419.wav Other audio English 33 Introduction, family background, work, education Albert Nieberding was born on February 24, 1924, in St. Paul, Alberta. His father came to Canada in 1911, his mother in 1921 from the Oldenburg area in Northern Germany. His father came from a family of doctors. After hearing stories of adventure, his father went to New York and traveled throughout North America. Nieberding recalls that his father worked in a survey party in St. Paul, Alberta, where he applied for a homestead and spent the years of WW I there. His father was fluent in French, English and German. Nieberding himself grew up in St. Paul and came to Edmonton at the age of 26 where he worked in the elevator trade. Later he was in the insuring business. After quitting, he worked in the Canadian North as a construction supervisor for the federal government. Nieberding recalls that he finished school with grade 10 and took most of 11 without finishing it. Nieberding grew up with two siblings. Apart from his immediate family, he had no other relatives in Canada. He talks about distant relatives in Germany. He once went to a Nieberding reunion in Germany where he met relatives from Australia, the US and Belgium. There is a book on his family history. He remembers that his mother was writing letters to her mother who was still living in Germany, as well as to a sister. Nieberding recalls that his mother had been a Red Cross nurse during WW I, and when she developed a hernia, she went back to Germany for surgery and came back after a year. She took her children with her. Despite his ancestry, Nieberding considers himself a Canadian. He says that he can understand some German but he never learned it in school. St. Paul, Alberta ethnic identity ; family life ; immigration ; labor (work) ; languages 53.533333, -113.5 17 Interview location: Edmonton, Alberta. 861 Meals, farm life, celebrations, groceries, clothing Nieberding recalls the meals of the day. He also talks about problems with food supply his mother had when still in Germany. He recalls about kerosine lamps and why his mother was cooking stews so often. He had to boil potatoes to feed the pigs as a child. Nieberdings shows the interviewer a picture of his mother's vegetable garden. Fishing also played an important role. At Christmas, they didn't have nothing too special. His parents never went to church and criticized others that they wouldn't give their horses a rest on Sunday as they went to church with them. Nieberding recalls that an ancestor of his was excommunicated from the Catholic church when he married a Lutheran woman. For him, the 1940s were more difficult than the 1930s as food was rationed. Nieberding recalls that when his mother came to Canada, the family spend only 45 dollars a winter. He recalls what his family was purchasing in stores in his childhood. HIs parents employed farm hands who would work on a farm for 5 dollars a month paid by the government during the Great Depression. He talks about what the family produced on their farm. The explains what kind of clothing he was wearing. Great Depression chores ; Christmas ; cook stoves ; farm chores ; fish ; lamps ; mail-order catalogs ; pigs ; potatoes ; religious identity ; stews ; turnips ; vegetables 53.533333, -113.5 17 Interview location: Edmonton, Alberta. No transcript. audio 0

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Citation

“Interview with Albert Nieberding 1.1,” Local Cultures, accessed June 15, 2021, https://localcultures.ukrfolk.ca/items/show/146.